ISSN:2424-9025
Impact of Tracheotomy in Tetanus Neonatorum on the Outcome in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Setting
Article Type: Original Article
Norah Alkhathlan1, Lujain K Abdalwassie2, Abdulrahman Althubaiti3, Khalil Sendi4, Talal Al-Khatib4*

1Department of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah Saudi Arabia

2Medical student, Faculty Of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University,P.o Box 80215 ,Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia

3Department of Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Faculty Of Medicine, University of Jeddah, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

4Department of Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Faculty Of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, P.o Box 80215 ,Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia

Corresponding Author:

Dr. Talal Al-Khatib

Department of Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery

Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University

P.o Box 80215, Jeddah 21589

Saudi Arabia.

Received: 2016-01-27 ; Accepted: 2016-02-29 ; Published: 2016-03-11
Citation: Alkhathlan N, Abdalwassie LK, Althubaiti A, Sendi K, Al-Khatib T (2016) Impact of Tracheotomy in Tetanus Neonatorum on the Outcome in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Setting. J ORTL 2:10456.
Copyright: © 2016 Al-Khatib T et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Objective: To assess the impact of performing tracheotomy in neonates with Tetanus Neonatorum on the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Length of stay.

 

Study design: Retrospective five year case series study.

 

Setting: Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at King Abdulaziz a University Hospital (KAUH).

 

Subjects and Methods: Retrospective chart review of neonates admitted to King Abdulaziz University Hospital with Tetanus Neonatorum from January 1st 2009 to 31st December 2013. The length of stay in Pediatric intensive care unit was compared between neonates who underwent tracheotomy and those who did not.

 

Results: Total of 59 neonates with Tetanus Neonatorum was included in the study. Tracheotomy was performed in 11 neonates (18.6%). The difference in the average length of stay in Pediatric intensive care unit for those who had tracheotomy compared to those who did not was statistically insignificant. While post Pediatric intensive care unit length of stay showed significantly longer mean length of stay in the tracheotomy group compared to the non-tracheotomy group (30.6 ± 14.2 vs. 15.7 ± 9.7 days, P <.001). In addition, tracheotomy group had significantly longer mean total length of stay (PICU and pediatric ward stay) (56.4 ± 18.1 vs. 42.3 ± 16.7 days, P= .017.


Conclusion: In neonates with Tetanus Neonatorum performing tracheotomy as part of the regular care did not decrease the Pediatric intensive care unit length of stay, and was associated with prolonged hospital length of stay.

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